9 okt. 2017

Kläder till Fru Cecilie Jonsdatter. Clothes for Mistress Cecilie Jonsdatter.

Here she is, the honorable Mistress Cecilie Jonsdatter. 
She is what my medieval group is based on, or more correctly, we are based on her will dated to 1307. We are called Cecilie Jonsdatters sällskap and you can check us out here and here.
Long story short, she was a very rich and influential and pious person, from what we can work out, and she lived her life in Skåne-Scania, and travelled much.
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The dress is mostly based on the Gown of Sct. Clare of Assisi. I was also looking at the Maciejowskij Bible at the women who looked extra in command and holy, just like I imagine Cecilie was. I, of course looked into a lot of different sources but these two were my main sources for inspiration. The dress is made from a fine wool fabric that is slightly fulled, but still sturdy.
St. Birgitta's Cap in the making.
To look the part Cecilie needed a St. Birgitta's cap, a wimple and a veil. 
For more information on how to make these items look at the blog of Cathrin Åhlén - Katafalk
No need for me to go through when you can go directly to her blog and find out for yourself, although I didn't follow the tutorials, I used them more as a guide. I for instance made the wimple longer so that it also covers the neck, because the person who will use it lives in a very windy place, this way you can pin the wimple down the neck to make it sit more secure. :)

I decided that the head wear should be made of silk fabrics and a really fine wool muslin from Medeltidsmode.
So, veil and wimple are made of a lovely silk fabric in a light natural white shade, much like the natural colour silk can have when unbleached, and the cap is made of the wool muslin, to (try) to lower the sound that silk makes, how ever luxurious it might seem it's a nuisance when placed right next to your ears. 
Me, in the cap to show off the silk embroidery.
And finally, Mistress Cecilie embraces the light coming in through the windows, looking all devout and graceful.